This Under-the-Radar Canadian Brand Is About to Be Huge

Two sisters: one tomboyish, the other feminine. Together Parris and Chloé Gordon make up Canadian-based brand Beaufille. The name, which means “handsome girl,” reflects the two’s contrasting styles, which when combined translate into a very cool, androgynous label, conveniently carried on Net-a-Porter as of this week.

On the heels of their second presentation in New York City on September 13, we hopped on the phone with the two to discuss the Beaufille ethos and also get the inside scoop on the recently terminated Toronto Fashion Week and what that means for Canadian fashion.

Scroll down to see what they had to say and to shop the collection.

Photo:

Beaufille

Growing up, Chloé and Parris were close. “During our high school years, we loosely talked about working together but never had means to do so,” Parris said. “Chloé, being two-and-a-half years older than me, went to art school first and fell in love. When the time came for me, I fell in love too.”

Chloé did fashion and textile design, and Parris studied jewelry design and metalsmithing. Their varied skillsets allowed them to create a few pieces that, after a photo shoot and some branding, they were able to sell locally. Eventually, they were accepted into Toronto Fashion Week, where they showed for a couple of years. In 2013, they rebranded as Beaufille.

Photo:

Beaufille

The two consider androgyny and the juxtaposition between masculine and feminine to be the ethos of the brand. And because both of their names are French and they grew up speaking the language, it was important to keep French elements woven throughout. The brand is effortless and unstudied while still reading subtly powerful. “The silhouettes are very relaxed but then executed in powerful fabrics. There are a lot of subtle details like ruffles, flares, and contrast stitching.”

Photo:

Beaufille

The collection always includes a handmade fabric. “I’ve been trying to dive back into my roots because I majored in textile design,” Chloé explained. “I started making textiles in water-soluble bags in school and revisited that for this season.” Though they don’t have the bandwidth to mass-produce these pieces, it still showcases their skillset and vision. “It’s so much fun to make, but it takes so much time, so we had to have a cap on them this season, which is sad because I want everyone to be able to get a piece.”

Photo:

Beaufille

Though Beaufille now shows during New York Fashion Week, it is still a Canadian brand, and as of now, Toronto Fashion Week is no more. “We think it’s a good thing for the city to reflect on what the fashion industry is going to be and how it’s going to integrate into the industry that exists in the rest of the world.” The two both agree that though the event gave them exposure, the return that you see at other fashion weeks, like New York or Paris, is incomparable. “It’s not like showing in [the other cities], where buyers meet directly after or sales or an editor pulls. The event didn’t reach the endgame that seems to be reasons designers show and participate in fashion week, and I think IMG realized that. It’s a good time to put heads together and figure out how we are going to finally assimilate into the industry.”

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Beaufille

Beaufille had an exciting moment this week when Net-a-Porter launched the brand’s product online. The website’s retail fashion director, Lisa Aiken, expressed over email that “the idea of minimalism in fashion is something that is always there and Beaufille is a brand that is offering a new interpretation whilst still feeling natural. … Beaufille is one of a curated collection of new brands from around the world that we’re truly excited about this season; as a global shopping destination, it’s crucial that we are constantly giving our customer the newest and best out there.” We couldn’t have said it better!

Keep going to shop Beaufille’s new arrivals for fall.