This Brand's Leggings Always Sell Out—and So Will Its New Swimsuits

Hilary George-Parkin
PHOTO:

ADAY

Too often, swimwear tends to fall into one of two categories: functional (i.e., the stuff you wear to swim laps in) and fashionable (i.e., the stuff you wear to Instagram on the beach). It's a rare occasion when a suit falls in the middle of this Venn diagram, letting you feel like an athlete—or at least a person who tries to get the gym every once in a while—while looking cute enough to keep on all day.

But leave it to ADAY, the two-year-old direct-to-consumer activewear brand behind some of our favorite work-to-workout leggings, to come up with two styles that not only check those boxes, but they are environmentally-conscious and versatile to boot. Today, the label is launching its first-ever swim collection—a one-piece called the For the Win Swimsuit ($125) and a bikini called the It Takes Two Piece ($105 for the set), both of which come in two colorways—which the team encourages styling as a bodysuit and bralette when you're not taking a dip.

The one-piece and the two-piece swimsuits are two fundamental pieces in a woman’s wardrobe, so it was only natural for us to create pieces that could also serve as the foundation of an outfit," says co-founder Meg He. "We wanted these silhouettes to cater to our customers’ different preferences and also provide them with a variety of styling choices."

The brand stayed true to its signature seasonless palette with two neutral options—a navy-and-white (reversible!) one-piece and a white-and-grey bikini—and introduced a pop of bright green in the second colorway of each style, a nod to the recycled polyamide fabric used to make the suits.

While the swimsuits feature the same bonded seams that have made ADAY's leggings so popular, the category presented a new challenge: the suits had to be as form-fitting as possible, while still looking streamlined and staying in place.

"Usually, seams are used to contour and shape around the body, but for the FTW Swimsuit, we wanted to minimize seams and keep the suit lightweight and abrasion-free," says designer and product developer Millie Maidens. "So, we used our signature bonding technique that is soft on the body and stronger than any sewn seams, making the garment much more durable." Likewise, the paneled bikini bottoms feature two layers of fabric at the center front, but only one at the sides and edges, minimizing bulk while maintaining coverage.

Who else is ready to dive in? Shop both styles below, and see what all the fuss is about.

Add a Comment

More Stories
1